Dog Training; Giving your dog a time out

Giving your dog a time out, while attempting any behavior modification program. Has unfortunately became part, of the new dog training and behavior terminologies that are commonly used by a number of today’s animal professionals.

The premise of the ‘Time out” is to enable your dog to have a moment of reflection, on his own behaviors. And that, any behavior modification process that successfully integrates the use of time outs, will ultimately have positive results with the animal.

For most of you reading this, I don’t have to tell you how stupid this is. Half the human population, lacks the ability to reflect on their own behaviors. Yet some trainers expect a dog, to reflect on theirs.

NOW, giving your dog a time out, is useful for one thing and one thing only. To give you a break. If you find that, while you are attempting to train your dog, you start getting frustrated or annoyed. Put him, wherever, you normally put him. Whether it is outside, a crate, his pen or a bedroom. This is so you can regain control over your emotions and calm down.

So remember, giving your dog a time out, doesn’t teach your dog anything. The dogs time out is for you.

The Spirit Dog

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Dog Behavior and The Time Out; Dog Training

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4 Responses

  1. Hi Dawn,

    The problem that we run across here is, it’s a dog. It can only think like a dog, which is nothing like us. A dog will not learn anything meaningful from time outs. We are talking about a species of animals that likes to eat it’s own poop ( not to mention cat, horse, cow, geese and any other kind of stinky disgusting thing they can find. And for entertainment like to dig holes, chew up stuff and chase most things that move.

    The only really positive thing that a timeout accomplishes, is giving the owners a momentary break from whatever the dog is doing. Unfortunately the outcome is not usually good for the dog, once the owner continually does this with little to no improvement.

    There are many problems with the pack analogy you stated, (1) most dogs in packs do not care what another pack member does and (2) if a specific pack member did have a problem with what one of his pack mates was doing he would either (A) Give him a look that says cut it out. (B) Give him a look and a growl that says you better watch it, or (C) forgo the look and the growl and just bite him in the head.

    Thank you for your comment.

  2. You’ve misunderstood the purpose of the time out. Dogs are pack animals, and by giving them a time out, you’re removing the reward of being part of the pack. It’s as simple at that.

    In behavioral psychology, this is called a negative punishment, the removal of a desired stimulus. In this case, the desired stimulus is time with you.

  3. [...] Time-out method [...]

  4. [...] Dog Training; Giving your dog a time out Giving your dog a time out, while attempting any behavior modification program. Has unfortunately became part, of the new dog training and behavior terminologies that are commonly used by a number of today’s animal professionals. The premise of the ‘Time out” is to enable your dog to have a moment of reflection, on his own behaviors. And that, any behavior modification process that successfully integrates the use of time outs, will ultimately have positive results with the animal. For most o [...]

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